"Nathan was courteous and professional. He arrived on time and installed the garage door opener with no probelms. He tuned up our old garage door opener and installed it on our third car garage. He also added the new garage door opener to our cars for home link. I will call on Nathan for all my garage/ garage door opener needs and recommend him to my friends and neighbors."
This is the second time we have used this company. A year ad a half ago our spring broke on our single garage door and this week the spring broke on the double door. Each time a very neat young man came with excellent communication skiills and knowledge of the repair required. They arrive right on time and fixed it on the spot in a very timely manner at a fairly reasonable price. I have always been a person that never wanted to have a repairman come without my husband home. Based on the quality of the two employees I have had the pleaser of dealing with, that fear is unwarranted for this company.
Here is an odd problem that I cannot figure out. I am handy with electrical stuff, but this one has me stumped. My small kitchen appliances all work on a single circuit, with 5 outlets. One of those outlets has a 20Amp breaker built into it with a test and resent button (I never understood what the test button is for). I only have a toaster, a floor lamp and occasionally a coffee grinder plugged into the circuit. Suddenly, none of the outlets work. Nothing new, no new appliances, the whole circuit went dead. I noticed when I trigger the reset button, there is an immediate click and it goes out again. I have tripped and reset the main breaker on the circuit board in the garage, nothing. Power gets to the outlet, but it doesn't work and there is no electricity in any of the 5. I un plugged everything. Reset the breaker on the outlet. It clicked again immediately, still no electricity. I changed out the outlet, with a new one with breaker built in which I bought today at Home Depot. Same problem. I tested for electricity, the outlet with the built in breaker receives 120v electricity coming in, but it always seems to be shorted out and does not send it out. I assume that all of the 5 outlets are connected inline, so thinking that if I went one by one, I'd be able to find a short. I opened all of the boxes, checked everything and all looks clean, new, no problems. I completely disconnected the two outlets that are closest to the main one with thereset button and nothing.Help
Squealing, screeching, or grinding noises from your garage door are usually indicative of a lack of lubricant or an accumulation of dirt or debris in the tracks. When removing debris, do not use harsh chemicals to clean the tracks. Once the track is clean, coat it with lubricant designed especially for garage doors, if possible. If you do not have access to this special type of lubricant, you can use WD-40 on the tracks and hardware.
Annual maintenance. Make an annual check of all nuts and bolts on rails and rollers to make sure they’re firmly tightened. Check the condition of all cables to make sure they’re not worn or frayed. Lubricate rollers and springs with a garage-door lubricant (see How to Fix a Noisy Garage Door for maintenance and problem-solving tips). The door should operate smoothly and be properly balanced. Check the balance by disconnecting the opener and lowering the door halfway- the door should hold its position. If it doesn’t, adjust the spring tension or replace the springs.
Garage door repair is a specialized job, which is typically handled by a garage door repair service. Professional garage door repair technicians can test or repair a garage door system and fix cosmetic blemishes on doors. Common requests include help with jammed or inoperable doors, slow or erratic doors, unusual sounds, dents or scrapes on the door, and general system testing. Garage door repair professionals can work on single-car, double-car and RV-size garage doors.
There are many lubricants out there but many garage door experts suggest using WD-40 (or similar light weight oil) twice a year to keep garage doors in working shape. All the moving parts of the door should be lubricated, including the hinges, the springs and the rollers. A bead of oil across the top of the springs will give a nice coating, and spraying the rollers is most effective. Also, it’s a good idea to check your garage door hardware for loose screws, nuts and bolts as you lubricate.
It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, that's exactly the kind of day when moisture and cold can conspire to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is just a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button. If the door refuses to budge on the first attempt, though, resist the urge to keep banging on the automatic opener button. This is likely to cause a more serious problem with the garage door opener—including, but not limited to, stripped gears, broken springs, and a burned-out motor on the opener.
The history of the garage door could date back to 450 BC when chariots were stored in gatehouses, but in the U.S. it arose around the start of the 20th century. As early as 1902, American manufacturers—including Cornell Iron Works—published catalogs featuring a "float over door." Evidence of an upward-lifting garage door can be found in a catalog in 1906.[4]
The tech that serviced your door must not understand simple mechanics. The tracks do not move, so they do not need to be lubricated. All that does is make a mess. The rollers and hinges DO move, so it is logical to lubricate them, at the hinge barrel or pivot point, and in the little area near the stem of the rollers where you can see the bearings. Adding a bit of lube to the torsion spring also cuts down on the friction between the coils and makes the spring glide easier. However, too much will make it spritz out lube as the door opens and closes, and that it less than desirable. Same thing for pulleys on an extension spring door. 

Using your drill, add tension to the torsion spring. This system uses a single spring for a double door, but many manufacturers use two springs for a double door. The painted line on the spring acts as a gauge for the number of turns you put on the spring. To keep the bar from turning while you’re adding tension, attach a locking pliers to the bar on both ends of the spring. Apply lubricant for garage doors to the spring.
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