Here is an odd problem that I cannot figure out. I am handy with electrical stuff, but this one has me stumped. My small kitchen appliances all work on a single circuit, with 5 outlets. One of those outlets has a 20Amp breaker built into it with a test and resent button (I never understood what the test button is for). I only have a toaster, a floor lamp and occasionally a coffee grinder plugged into the circuit. Suddenly, none of the outlets work. Nothing new, no new appliances, the whole circuit went dead. I noticed when I trigger the reset button, there is an immediate click and it goes out again. I have tripped and reset the main breaker on the circuit board in the garage, nothing. Power gets to the outlet, but it doesn't work and there is no electricity in any of the 5. I un plugged everything. Reset the breaker on the outlet. It clicked again immediately, still no electricity. I changed out the outlet, with a new one with breaker built in which I bought today at Home Depot. Same problem. I tested for electricity, the outlet with the built in breaker receives 120v electricity coming in, but it always seems to be shorted out and does not send it out. I assume that all of the 5 outlets are connected inline, so thinking that if I went one by one, I'd be able to find a short. I opened all of the boxes, checked everything and all looks clean, new, no problems. I completely disconnected the two outlets that are closest to the main one with thereset button and nothing.Help

Automatic doors require not only the installation of a heavy door, but the motor and cables as well. Automatic doors are much more common now because of their convenience, but in a case such as the heavy wood door, they are a necessity. A strong motor is required to pull up a heavy door. However, automatic doors are not without their faults -- they quickly become a manual door when the power goes out.

Instead, try other methods that might break the frozen connection between the door and the floor. For example, you can use a heat gun or hair dryer to melt the ice and free the door. Standard de-icing products can also work. And if you are careful not to damage the door or the seal on the bottom of the door, you can use a flat shovel or similar tool to chip away at the ice.
If you have a steel door, but want the look of a wood one, it is not necessary to change your entire garage door. Often, it may be possible to mimic the look of wood with skillful painting. Your local home improvement store may be able to provide good advice about the type of paint and brushes needed to mimic the look of wood for your particular door material.
Carriage: These doors mimic the look of doors found on old carriage houses in the days of horses and buggies. Because of their rustic look, they are often favored in the West and Southwest of the United States. The doors swing open like oversized French doors and hang from jambs on hinges. With their unique look, they create an area of visual interest for your home and are quite energy efficient. The downside is they require a considerable amount of clearance to work properly. Because most carriage garage doors are largely composed of wood, you may need to replace deteriorating or rotting door materials. The average cost for carriage garage door repairs is $133.

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